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Kriss Akabusi

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Kriss is famous for his achievements in Athletics. His greatest individual triumph was his Gold Medal in the 1990 European Championships when he also beat David Hemery's 22-year-old British record. Kriss began his international career in 1983 as a member of the 4x400 metre relay squad. But he will always be remembered for helping Britain to clinch the Gold and beat the Americans in the 4 x 400 metre relay in Tokyo in 1991.
 
Kriss now works in the media and in public relations where his dynamic personality and personal skills have combined with his reputation as a fantastic performer. It's no surprise that he is a very popular celebrity and much sought-after as a guest speaker both for after-dinner and as a keynote motivational speaker.
 
Kriss' speeches entertain, inform and inspire each and every individual to be more successful, both personally and corporately as a team member. Some of Kriss’ key messages are that learning is for life and that, ultimately, we all need to use our individual skills within a team environment.
 
His military career began in 1975 when he joined up as a trainee data telegraphist in the Royal Signals. He transferred to the Army Physical Training Corps (1981) and was discharged into the reserves (1990) with an exemplary record as a Warrant Officer Class 2.
 
Kriss' character and personality were first identified by the media when he was a competing athlete. His break into television came in 1993 when he presented The Big Breakfast, followed rapidly by a full-time position on Record Breakers. He has presented children's programmes, in particular Saturday morning television. He appears regularly on programmes including game shows but his appearances are not restricted to television as he’s often heard on the radio debating serious topics of the day.
 
Kriss was chosen to join the commentary team on BBCRadio5 Live for the London 2012 Olympics. His insightful comments from the athlete’s point of view and his sense of humour added to the success of the BBC’s coverage.
 
We suggest you don’t book Kriss if you want a dull lecture (!) - events with Kriss are never dull.